18th Nov2017

(Video) When A$AP Ferg Met DJ Premier

by @Djordje

Earlier this month, A$AP Ferg and DJ Premier teamed up for the release of a joint single, “Our Streets.” When they recently visited The FADER’s offices, the pair sat down for an endearing exchange in which they discussed the process of creating the song and peeled back the layers of their careers. Ferg enthusiastically asked the legendary Premier about his Houston beginnings and early Motown inspirations. Watch above as they bridge a gap between generations and bond over the importance of paying homage.

Via The FADER.

06th Nov2017

(Video) A$AP Ferg on His New Era Collab and Expanding His Brand

by @Djordje

A$AP Ferg, along with his cousin Demetrius, speak to their collaboration with New Era, what inspired their creations, and how collaborations can usher in a new wave of fans.

Via Complex.

01st Nov2017

Jimmy Choo Style Diary with A$AP Ferg

by @Djordje

The impact of hip hop on fashion can hardly be overstated. Since its emergence in the 1970s, one of the key factors in hip hop’s success has been the combined appeal of different forms of creative expression. Harlem-born rapper A$AP Ferg, shot here exclusively in Jimmy Choo’s A/W 2017 collection, has operated very much within that tradition. As a musician, artist, designer and general polymath, for this 29-year-old—originally christened Darold D. Brown Ferguson, Jr.—creativity has always been about more than just the music.

“Through fashion and art I am able to communicate with everyone, in all walks of life,” Ferg explains as we survey the selection of decadent slippers and hand-finished DERBY loafers lining the Grand Penthouse Suite sitting atop New York’s Plaza Hotel. “Rap can pigeonhole you sometimes. It can be hard to communicate with people outside of the community once you’re in it—but with fashion and art it’s limitless. Designing and creating art allow me to think more broadly and that helps me to push hip hop culture forward.”

Fashion, in particular, has been a lifelong pursuit inspired by his father’s involvement in the business. “A lot of my father’s work influenced my early style—and even now—because he was the first person I knew who owned a boutique,” Ferg recalls. “He had workers in a factory producing his clothing and he made his own clothing line, featuring silk screen and graphic designs on t-shirts.”

Continue reading on Jimmy Choo.

01st Nov2017

Mixed Messages Live From Shanghai with A$AP Ant & A$AP Twelvyy

by @Djordje

Mixed Messages Live From Shanghai, listen to King Solomon and Despot talk comics, Nintendo and exchange rates with special guests A$AP Ant and A$AP Twelvyy. Listen to the podcast here.

01st Nov2017

A$AP Twelvyy On A$AP Yams, Renting Luxury Cars & Why He’s Staying Off The Internet

by @Djordje

“A$AP MOB, WHAT TIME IS IT?” was the recurring question of the evening at The Shrine Expo Hall in Los Angeles on Tuesday (October 24). The group pushed hard during its “AWGEST (August): Month of the Mob” campaign, kicking off the month-long takeover with A$AP Twelvyy’s 12 debut album, following it up with A$AP Ferg’s Still Striving and the crew-effort, Cozy Tapes Vol. 2. Those efforts have been rewarded with a sold-out 20-city tour.

With 12, Twelvyy aims to prove why he deserves the A$AP moniker in his name. Contrary to what many may think, Twelvyy is actually one of the founding members of the Mob and was handpicked by the late A$AP Yams himself.

Twelvyy’s “Hop Out” video currently sits at over 2 million views on YouTube — but to him, that’s nothing. He wants more. HipHopDX spoke with Twelvyy to discuss why his debut project took six years to be released, A$AP Yams, the pros and cons of social media, and more.

Continue reading on HipHopDX.

26th Oct2017

(Video) A$AP Ferg Talks Kid Cudi & Experimenting with His Art on TRL

by @Djordje

A$AP Ferg discusses being a man of many talents and a possible Kid Cudi collaboration. Check him freestyling below as well.

26th Oct2017

Smooky MarGielaa Interview with The FADER

by @Djordje

Smooky MarGielaa’s 15th year of life has been more exciting than probably most other kids his age can say. The Bronx rapper and singer has a slightly raspy, light-beam of a voice that has captivated artists — he has features sprinkled across A$AP Mob’s Cozy Tapes: Vol 2 — and audiences alike; check his self-released loosies like the heartfelt and anthemic “Stay 100,” or the delightfully braggy “Money Talk.” It’s an impressive body of work from someone so young and new, but from the first few seconds of hearing his voice on any song, it becomes clear this isn’t Smooky’s first go at music.

From around the age of seven, Smooky was *touring across* the U.S. with his father, Malian artist Abdoulaye Diabaté, performing alongside him on djembe and balafon. Around the same time, he’d regularly perform covers of Michael Jackson songs at West African cultural events that took place in and around New York: “I think that’s what really made me sing. If it wasn’t for that, I don’t think I would be singing.” In middle school, he started recording songs on his cell phone and sharing them via Soundcloud and Facebook, earning him local popularity. Soon after, he made the most of a chance encounter with A$AP Rocky, and hasn’t looked back since.

While in Dallas, Texas, for a Cozy Tour stop, Smooky talked to us over the phone about his upbringing, what he’s learned from his time on tour, and how he’s balancing school and music. He also shared some words about his new song “The Judge,” a song from his upcoming MMM mixtape, produced entirely by CashMoney AP. Listen to the track, and get to know Smooky, below.

Continue reading on The FADER.

24th Oct2017

(Video) A$AP Rocky Answers Questions From Raf Simons, André 3000, Mahershala Ali, and More

by @Djordje

“Let’s embrace the chaos,” A$AP Rocky says. We’re backstage in Philly after A$AP Mob’s big show and Rocky is feeling the energy of his crowded dressing room. “Rolling Stones in 1967, feel me?” So we set up our cameras and served up questions we’d collected from a few of Rocky’s famous friends and admirers, like Raf Simons, André 3000, Mahershala Ali, Dior designer Kris Van Assche, and Rocky’s Dope co-star Shameik Moore. Fellow Mob members A$AP Ferg, Nast, Twelvyy, and Ant chimed in with a few of their own questions and answers, too—until the fire alarm went off and we all had to run out of there. Check it out in the video above, and see the full interview and cover shoot here.

Via GQ Style.

24th Oct2017

A$AP Rocky Talks New Album, Under Armour Deal, and His Deep Love of Flowers

by @Djordje

Our interview with A$AP Rocky was supposed to take place backstage after an A$AP Mob concert in Philly, in a quiet, empty room, but in the moment, Rocky had a better idea. “We need to capture this chaos right here,” he said, gesturing around his dressing room, still packed with Mob members, girls, security guards, other unidentified loiterers, and even (according to A$AP Ferg, anyway) a loose mouse. “Let’s embrace the chaos,” Rocky suggested. “Rolling Stones in 1967, feel me?”

He took his spot in the middle of a leather couch, surrounded by his old friends from Harlem—Ferg, Nast, Ant, and Twelvyy—and started methodically breaking down a small mound of weed as he spoke in a post-concert rasp. Every so often, he’d tease me for asking so many questions. But some of them he didn’t mind so much: GQ Style had collected them from a few of Rocky’s notable friends and admirers, with a promise of bringing back answers.

The chaos Rakim Mayers attracts is a result of his charisma, which is raw and uncut. It is el puro, perhaps the purest of any star in pop culture—Hollywood, music, fashion, whatever. And given that Rocky’s mom named him and his elder sister, Erika B. Mayers, after Eric B. & Rakim, it was only natural that a kid who seems to crank up the color saturation whenever he walks into a room would channel his God-given wattage into rap music. From the beginning, though, Rocky also established himself as a style innovator and made fashion an inextricable part of his music. In his breakout video, for “Peso,” he repped hard-edged, gothic-leaning streetwear like Black Scale, as well as more established avant-garde fashion like Rick Owens and Y3, while rapping, Raf Simons, Rick Owens usually what I’m dressed in. That was back in 2011, long before he cemented Simons’s unlikely hip-hop-icon status with the song “Raf” this July. It’s not a stretch to say Rocky is partially responsible for making European high fashion as much a part of hip-hop and pop culture as streetwear.

Continue reading on GQ Style.

20th Oct2017

(Video) Marty Baller Freestyle & Interview with Tim Westwood

by @Djordje

Watch Marty Baller spit a freestyle above, and then sit down with Tim Westwood to discuss his European tour, the Harlem swag, working with the A$AP Mob, Scott Storch & his type of ladies.

17th Oct2017

A$AP Ant Wants To Be The Kanye West of Baltimore

by @Djordje

Ask Adam Kirkman when he got into fashion, and he’ll tell you he’s always been “fresh.”

The 24-year-old Baltimorean grew up admiring the skaters who frequented city streets as well as the sneakers at Gentei, a now-defunct streetwear store off Morton Street. Now, he has 300 pairs of sneakers by his mother’s estimation and his own line of skatewear, plus a budding rap career.

“Seventh grade going into eighth grade, the back-to-school clothes … that was the step into the game,” he said. “I remember telling some girl ‘I’m about to wear skinny jeans’ — she was like ‘Ew, don’t wear no skinny jeans’ — now her boyfriend probably wears skinny jeans.”

Kirkman, better known by his stage names A$AP Ant and YG Addie, is the only Baltimore native in the A$AP Mob, a rap collective based in Harlem. Additionally, he’s one of the members breaking into the fashion world via his skatewear brand, Marino Infantry.

Continue reading on The Baltimore Sun.

13th Oct2017

(Video) In Your Face: Interview with A$AP Rocky

by @Djordje

Love, Sex, Dreams. Celebrated rapper A$AP Rocky was interviewed by Lou Stoppard in his hotel room in Shanghai for our confrontational ‘In Your Face’ series. The pair talk everything from Raf Simons, Harlem and the stigma surrounding drug-use, to what it means to be a man in 2017.

Via SHOWstudio.

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